Employment Contract

If you undertake work for an employer as an employee, worker, or even on a self employed basis, you will have a contractual relationship with your employer. You do not necessarily need a written contract to establish a contractual relationship, you can also have a verbal contract. We can take your instructions and consider various verbal and written communications between you and your employer to determine what would be considered to be terms of your employment contract.
Oftentimes an employer will give an employee a detailed written contract of employment, and quite often they will also refer to their staff handbook, which will contain the employer’s policies. We can explain the terms of such contracts and policies to you and advise you if you are, or your employer is, in breach of the terms and how you should proceed.

We can advise employees, workers, agency workers, and those working on a self employed basis. We can carefully review your contractual documentation and make sure that it meets the requirements of current legislation. We can also assist you in negotiating terms in your contract to make them more favourable to you.
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Compromise Agreements

A compromise agreement is a contract in which an employee or former employee accepts compensation (normally a financial settlement) in exchange for dropping all claims against an employer. If you find yourself in a situation where you have been asked to sign a compromise agreement, speak to one of our legal advisors immediately. We can determine whether the terms of the agreement are fair, and in some cases we will negotiate a higher payment or better terms for you.

Contracts of Employment (for Individuals)

Employment contracts can be written down or in oral form. They govern the relationship between employers and employees and detail the rights and responsibilities that each enjoys. Our trained legal advisors will help you negotiate a more favourable employment contract and explain the terms of your contract to ensure you are aware of all your rights, whether actual or implied.

If you have been dismissed from your employment or wish to leave, our advisors will explain which parts of your contract have been breached and what you can do about this. They will also advise you of your statutory rights and help you gain recompense if they have been breached. As there are usually strict time limits within which you can protect yourself, please contact our employment experts immediately for comprehensive and clear advice.
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Non-payment of Wages/Holiday/Notice

Employment contracts often contain clauses that allow employers to deduct your wages in certain circumstances. Our employment experts can confirm whether your employer is allowed to make such deductions or if they are acting unlawfully. In some cases you may be able to claim for unlawful deduction from your wages. Our specialist employment law experts will guide you through the process, advising you and helping you claim back any money that you are owed.

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